Is my Fairfax teenager likely to suffer a brain injury in high school?

All parents worry about their children getting hurt. Accidents are a normal part of life in Fairfax, and occur everyday at schools as a result of bullying, sports, or simple adolescent behavior. This added potential for accidents within schools increases the likelihood that your teenager may suffer a head or brain injury.

Although yearly, over half a million emergency room visits related to brain injuries are reported for children less than 14 years old, adolescents between the ages of 15 to 19 are more likely to actually sustain traumatic brain injuries. Most accidents resulting in a head injury are relatively harmless and do not cause internal damage. However, depending on the circumstances—such as a hard tackle by a quarterback or a fall from a human pyramid—a head trauma can be extremely dangerous and needs to be taken very seriously.

The most common brain injury for teenagers to suffer is a concussion. Concussions are caused when the head or spine is violently shaken or hit. Concussions can vary from being very mild to the very serious, with effects ranging from slight headaches to permanent brain damage. Therefore, it is extremely important to recognize the signs of a concussion in order to seek immediate medical attention. These symptoms include:

  • Strong reoccurring head or neck pain
  • Dizziness or loss of balance
  • Loss of consciousness or memory
  • Confusion
  • Lethargic behavior
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Blurred vision

Any one of these signs could be an indication of a concussion and should be immediately examined by your child’s physician.

If your teenager has sustained a concussion or other form of head injury and you wish to obtain legal advice or information, please don’t hesitate to visit the Fairfax teenage head injury lawyers at Shevlin Smith, or call us at 703.591.0067 to schedule a free consultation.

Michael J. Shevlin
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Specializing in medical malpractice and serious personal injury cases since 1994.