What information can I provide to an attorney to assist the attorney in the review process of my case?

The most significant information that you can provide to your attorney is a factual description of how the accident occurred and what injuries you sustained.  Other helpful information is as follows:

    1.   Police Report:  If the police responded to the accident and conducted an investigation a copy of the Police Report is helpful.  This document will help your attorney determine whether charges were filed against the other driver, whether there were eyewitnesses who were interviewed at the accident scene, and whether the other driver made any statements to the police officer that might assist you in your case.

    2.   Your Insurance Policy:  A copy of your insurance policy is extremely helpful.  There are a number of reasons why your own insurance policy is relevant.  First, Virginia motorists often carry insurance coverage known as Medical Expense Benefits.  Under this type of coverage (for which you have paid premiums), your own insurance will reimburse you for medical expenses that you and/or your health insurance company have paid for your injuries.  Second, in some circumstances, the person who caused the accident does not have enough, or any, insurance to compensate you for the injuries they caused you.  In those circumstances, you may have insurance coverage, known as Uninsured Motorist coverage or Underinsured Motorist coverage (UM/UIM), that will provide additional benefits to you.

    3.   Your Medical Records:  A copy of your medical records, including emergency room records, ambulance records, and follow-up care records, will help us corroborate your injuries.

    4.   Pictures:  If you have taken pictures of your vehicle or of the injuries you sustained, the pictures are often helpful in the presentation of your claim.
Michael J. Shevlin
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Specializing in medical malpractice and serious personal injury cases since 1994.